M.i.s. policy

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Introduction

At Mooltripakdee International School (M.I.S.) the safety and wellbeing of our students is at the core of everything we do. Our aim of creating a “happy, safe and welcoming community” is a fundamental part of our mission statement so we take our responsibilities for the protection and safeguarding of our students very seriously. M.I.S. recognises both its ethical and legal responsibilities for the safety and welfare of its students.

This policy sets out the measures we have put in place to fulfill our child protection and safeguarding responsibilities in line with our core aim of providing a “safe, secure, child friendly learning environment.”

Definitions

In this policy, Child Protection is defined as – the protection of children from violence, exploitation, abuse and neglect.

Safeguarding is defined as – the action that is taken to promote the welfare of children and protect them from harm.

Our Principles

Child protection and safeguarding arrangements at M.I.S. are governed by three key principles:

(1) M.I.S. has a child-centered philosophy which values the needs, wishes, views and voices of its students.

(2) Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility: all staff should play their part in keeping children safe.

(3) All members of staff need a clear understanding of abuse and neglect as it is defined in this policy. They also need to know how to identify, report and respond to abuse and neglect. Staff should feel confident that when they report a concern relating to child protection it will be dealt with swiftly and securely, in a manner that follows the correct procedures and has the safety and well-being of the children as the top priority.

Our Policy

There are nine main elements to our policy which are laid out in the following sections:

(1) The types of abuse that are covered by the policy.

(2) Safeguarding roles, responsibilities and procedures

(3) Record Keeping

(4) Professional Confidentiality

(5) Creating a Safe Environment

(6) Staff recruitment procedures

(7) Allegations against Staff

(8) Staff Training

(9) Management and oversight of the policy

1.  Types of Abuse

British safeguarding guidelines identify four types of child abuse and it is these four which are covered by this policy. They are:

1.1  Physical Abuse

Physical abuse may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when an adult fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

Signs of Physical Abuse

Most children will collect cuts and bruises and injuries, and these should always be interpreted in the context of the child’s medical / social history, developmental stage and the explanation given.  Most accidental bruises are seen over bony parts of the body, e.g. elbows, knees, shins, and are often on the front of the body.  Some children, however, will have bruising that is more than likely inflicted rather than accidental.

Important indicators of physical abuse are bruises or injuries that are either unexplained or inconsistent with the explanation given; these can often be visible on the ‘soft’ parts of the body where accidental injuries are unlikely, such as cheeks, abdomen, back and buttocks.

A delay in seeking medical treatment when it is obviously necessary is also a cause for concern.

The physical signs of abuse may include:

(a) Unexplained bruising, marks or injuries on any part of the body.

(b) Multiple bruises, in clusters, often on the upper arm, outside of the thigh.

(c) Cigarette burns.

(d) Human bite marks.

(e) Broken bones.

(f) Scalds, with upward splash marks.

(g) Multiple burns with a clearly demarcated edge.

Changes in behaviour that can also indicate physical abuse:

(a) Fear of parents being approached for an explanation.

(b) Aggressive behaviour or severe temper outbursts.

(c) Flinching when approached or touched.

(d) Reluctance to get changed, for example in hot weather.

(e) Depression.

(f) Withdrawn behaviour.

(g) Running away from home.

1.2  Emotional Abuse

Emotional abuse is the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child to the extent that it severely and persistently harms their emotional development. It may involve conveying to children that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person.  It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond the child’s developmental capability, as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction.

It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyber bullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children.

Signs of Emotional Abuse

Emotional abuse can be difficult to identify as there are often no outward physical signs. Indications may be a developmental delay due to a failure to thrive and grow. However, children who appear well-cared for may nevertheless be emotionally abused by being taunted, put down or belittled.  They may receive little or no love, affection or attention from their parents or carers.  Emotional abuse can also take the form of children not being allowed to mix or play with other children.

Changes in behaviour which can indicate emotional abuse include:

(a) Neurotic behaviour e.g. sulking, hair twisting, rocking.

(b) Being unable to play.

(c) Fear of making mistakes.

(d) Sudden speech disorders.

(e) Self-harm.

(f) Fear of parent being approached regarding their behaviour.

(g) Developmental delay in terms of emotional progress.

1.3  Sexual Abuse

Sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact or non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet).  Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males; women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

Signs of Sexual Abuse

It is recognised that there is underreporting of sexual abuse within the family.  All staff should report any concerns that may have arisen through, for example, the observation and play of younger children and by understanding the indicators of behaviour in older children which may be symptomatic of such abuse.

All Staff should be aware that adults who use children to meet their own sexual needs may abuse both girls and boys of all ages. Also, in some cases older children may be abusing younger children. Indications of sexual abuse may be physical or from the child’s behaviour.

In all cases, children who tell about sexual abuse do so because they want it to stop.  It is important, therefore, that they are listened to and taken seriously.

The physical signs of sexual abuse may include:

(a) Pain or itching in the genital area.

(b) Bruising or bleeding near genital area.

(c) Sexually transmitted disease.

(d) Vaginal discharge or infection.

(e) Stomach pains.

(f) Discomfort when walking or sitting down.

Changes in behaviour which can also indicate sexual abuse include:

(a) Sudden or unexplained changes in behaviour e.g. becoming aggressive or withdrawn.

(b) Fear of being left with a specific person or group of people.

(c) Having nightmares.

(d) Running away from home.

(e) Sexual knowledge which is beyond their age, or developmental level.

(f) Sexual drawings or language.

(g) Bedwetting.

(h) Eating problems such as overeating or anorexia.

(i) Self-harm or mutilation, sometimes leading to suicide attempts.

(j) Saying they have secrets they cannot tell anyone about.

(k) Substance or drug abuse.

(l) Suddenly having unexplained sources of money.

(m) Not allowed to have friends (particularly in adolescence).

1.4    Neglect

Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. It may include a failure to:

(a) Provide adequate food, clothing and shelter.

(b) Protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger.

(c) Ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or

(d) Ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.

(e) Respond to a child’s basic emotional needs.

Signs of Neglect

It can be difficult to recognise neglect, however its effects can be long term and damaging for children.

The physical signs of neglect may include:

(a) Being constantly dirty or ‘smelly’.

(b) Constant hunger, sometimes stealing food from other children.

(c) Losing weight, or being constantly underweight.

(d) Inappropriate or dirty clothing.

Neglect may be indicated by changes in behaviour which may include:

(a) Mentioning being left alone or unsupervised.

(b) Not having many friends.

(c) Complaining of being tired all the time.

(d) Not requesting medical assistance and/or failing to attend appointments.

2.  Safeguarding Roles, Responsibilities and Procedures

All staff should remain alert to the signs of possible abuse. They also need to know what their role is in terms of Child Protection and Safeguarding and what procedures to follow when a case of suspected abuse has been identified.

It is the responsibility of every person working at MIS to report ALL suspected instances of abuse to a member of the Child Protection and Safeguarding team.

These are the key child protection and safeguarding responsibilities all staff need to follow:

(2.1) Listening to, and seeking out, the views, wishes and feelings of children and young people, ensuring that what they say is respected and acted upon;

(2.2) Understanding the school’s Child Protection and Safeguarding policy and its implications for their role in the school and their interactions with children;       

(2.3) Being alert to the signs of abuse including, but not limited to, the signs outlined in section 1 of this policy and their need to refer any concerns to a member of the Child Protection and Safeguarding team;

(2.4) Accurately recording any concerns held about a child in the school and any action taken to address those concerns;

(2.5) Sharing information and working together with agencies to provide children and young people with the help and support they need;

3. Record Keeping:

Keeping comprehensive records is a key part of good Child Protection and Safeguarding practice.

(3.1) All staff need to understand the importance of recording any concerns they have, or have had reported to them;

(3.2) Records need to be kept securely and confidentially and, where appropriate, passed on to other staff members and/or agencies;

(3.3) Any member of staff receiving a disclosure of abuse, noticing signs or indicators of abuse or having concerns about a student’s welfare should make a record of this as soon as possible. This record should include details about what has been reported or observed and include any relevant background or contextual information as well as a date and time. These records should then be dated and signed and kept in a secure location where confidentiality can be guaranteed; (see – Appendix 1: Safeguarding Incident Report Form)

(3.4) If a student transfers to another school, these records should be copied and forwarded to the Child Protection coordinator or Designated Safeguarding Lead at the new school.

4.  Professional Confidentiality:

Confidentiality is an important issue which needs to be fully understood by all members of staff, particularly in the context of child protection and Safeguarding.

(4.1) In matters of child protection and Safeguarding the only consideration where confidentiality is concerned is the best interests of the child. A member of staff must never guarantee confidentiality to a student nor should they agree to keep a secret;

(4.2) In matters of child protection all concerns must be reported to a member of the Child Protection and Safeguarding team  and, where appropriate, external agencies and authorities;

(4.3) Only those members of staff who have a professional need to know about a given Child Protection or Safeguarding case will be given that information. Any information shared with a member of staff in this way must be treated in the strictest confidence.

5.  Creating a Safe Environment

We recognize that creating a safe environment for our students is an ongoing process which requires regular monitoring and updating. This is a process to which all members of staff can contribute but we acknowledge the important roles played by key stake-holders, such as the site supervisor, in the effective implementation of initiatives.

(5.1) We will ensure that all staff are competent to carry out their responsibilities for Safeguarding in promoting the welfare of children by creating an environment and an ethos whereby all staff (including volunteers) feel able to raise concerns and are supported in their Safeguarding role;

(5.2) We actively encourage a culture of listening to children, taking account of their wishes, feelings and voices both in individual decisions and in the school’s development (including ideas and concerns raised by our school counsel);

(5.3) We will ensure that the buildings, including their surroundings, are safe and ones where children can feel safe. All classroom doors have clear glass windows which must be uncovered so as to allow occupants to be visible from outside the room.

(5.4) We will establish clear protocols on reception for visitors and contractors with procedures in place to ensure the appropriate questions are asked and checks made.

(5.5) We will let parents and carers know about our principles in child protection and Safeguarding and give them to access our policy both in print and on our website;

(5.6) We will not allow any child to leave with an adult who is not their parent or registered carer unless we have been notified in advance of that arrangement.

6.  Staff recruitment procedures

We aim to prevent people who pose a risk of harm from working with children by rigorously checking all staff who work with children and, where it is considered prudent, asking for further checks beyond what is legally required;

(6.1) We will, where applicable, check the identity of a person being considered for appointment and their right to stay in the Kingdom of Thailand;

(6.2) We will undertake overseas checks if a potential appointee has been working abroad;

(6.3) We will ensure staff and volunteers undergo appropriate criminal records checks, either in the Kingdom of Thailand or, where appropriate, their previous countries of residence;

(6.4) We will check references with measures in place to ensure scrutiny and to verify all potential staff;

(6.5) We will raise an alert with a senior member of the leadership team if there are gaps in references and/or any missing references;

(6.6) We will ensure that any volunteers are vetted before being invited to visit the school and adequately supervised whilst on the campus.

7.  Allegations against Staff

There are, all told, over 100 adults working at M.I.S. We are confident that our recruitment process makes it unlikely that an adult who may be inclined to abuse children would either seek or gain employment here, but it remains a possibility. All staff, therefore, should be alert to that possibility and know how to respond if they have a genuine concern.

(7.1)  Allegations of abuse may be raised by a student, a colleague or by other concerned adults;

(7.2)  Any concern about a member of staff or other adult visitor must be immediately reported to a member of the senior management team.

(7.3)  Any allegation of abuse will be dealt with in a fair and consistent way that both provides effective protection for the child and supports the staff member who is the subject of the allegation.

(7.4)  Malicious allegations against staff will be investigated by the School Principle and, if appropriate, the School Manager.

(7.5)  Where there are concerns about a member of the management team this should be reported to the School Principal. Concerns about the Principal should be referred to the School Proprietor and/or the School manager.

8.  Staff Training

We acknowledge the need for all staff members that have contact with children to receive adequate Child Protection and Safeguarding training. All staff who work with children will undertake appropriate child protection awareness training to equip them to carry out their responsibilities for child protection effectively. This will be kept up to date by refresher training at three yearly intervals.

(8.1)  The School Coordinator (Miss Jiew) will keep detailed records of all staff child protection training and will issue reminders when updates are required;

(8.2)  All members of the Child Protection and Safeguarding team (including the Head of Child Protection and the Designated Safeguarding Leads) will undertake appropriate training that allows them to deliver Safeguarding training to the rest of the staff;

(8.3)  All members of staff should have regular, mandatory Child Protection and Safeguarding training, delivered by the Child Protection and Safeguarding team;

(8.4)  New staff will be given Child Protection and Safeguarding training as part of their induction process. This will be kept up to date by refresher training at three yearly intervals;

(8.5)  All members of staff will be expected to read and agree to abide by the Child Protection and Safeguarding policy;

9.  Management and oversight of the policy

All staff members are expected to play a role in implementing our school’s Child Protection and Safeguarding policy but the responsibility for the management and oversight of the policy rests with the school proprietor and the senior management team.

These are the key areas of responsibility for the proprietor and senior management team in terms of the management and oversight of the policy:

(9.1)  Taking leadership responsibility for the school’s Child Protection and Safeguarding arrangements;

(9.2)  Keeping up to date with emerging issues in Safeguarding;

(9.3)  Ensuring that we have a Designated Safeguarding Lead for Child Protection, appointed from the Senior Management Team and one who oversees and line manages the activities and the activities of all other members of the Child Protection and Safeguarding team.

(9.4)  Ensuring that a Designated Safeguarding Lead is on the premises and available at all times during the school day and that there is a contact for school holiday activities on site. The leadership team will ensure there is cover at all times and that there is a clear pathway for raising and reporting concerns in a timely way whenever there are children on the premises.

(9.5)  Ensuring that appointed Designated Safeguarding Leads are fully equipped with the knowledge and skills to carry out the role and have access to appropriate regular training to help them keep up to date;

(9.6)  Ensuring that there are procedures are in place for handling allegations against staff or volunteers;

(9.7)  All new staff are given a mandatory induction which includes knowledge regarding abuse, neglect, specific safeguarding issues and familiarisation with Child Protection responsibilities;

(9.8)  That important related policies, such as those for behaviour and bullying, are kept up to date;

(9.9)  To ensure that children are taught about Safeguarding (including staying safe online) through teaching and learning opportunities as part of providing a broad and balanced curriculum;

(9.10)  That the citizenship curriculum will implement sex and relationship teaching and cover Safeguarding issues with children;

(9.11)  We have in place an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) to help address a widening range of issues associated with technology;

(9.12)  That we understand the updated definition of child sexual exploitation and expectations around identifying, reporting and responding to any potential or actual cases of;

(9.13)  Making sure that the Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy is shared with parents and carers.

                                              Designated Safeguarding Staff

Head of Child Protection and Safeguarding:                         Mark Grittner ( Principal)

Designated Safeguarding Leads                                             Dr. Matt Couts (Vice Principal – Secondary)

                                                                                               Matthew Bolton (Vice Principal – Primary)

                                                                                               Nissakorn Phimthong (Head of Personnel)

                                                                                               Orathai Moolpia (School Coordinator)

Consistency of Policies

This policy should read alongside the following school policies:

(a) Secondary Student Discipline Policy

(b) Primary Student Discipline Policy

(c) EYFS Student Behaviour Policy

(d) Appropriate Use Policy (AUP) for Digital and On-Line Resources

(e) Employee Handbook

(f) Anti-bullying Policy

(g) Mobile Phone Policy (letter to parents)

Legislation

The legal framework that underpins this policy has been informed by:

(a) The Children Act (U.K.) 1989

(b) The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child 1991

(c) The Child Protection Act (Thailand) 2003

(d) The Children Act (U.K.) 2004

1) Objectives of this Policy 

This policy outlines what MIS will do to prevent and tackle bullying. As a school whose stated objective is to provide a “safe, secure, child friendly learning environment” we operate a ‘zero tolerance’ policy towards bullying in any of its forms. Moreover, we believe that for an anti-bullying strategy to be truly effective it should include and involve the whole school community: students, staff members, parents and the local community.

Having defined what bullying means in the context of this policy, we will lay-out how we identify, prevent and respond to bullying; the procedures we have in place for dealing with incidents of bullying; and how we involve both students and their parents in these procedures.

2) Definition of Bullying 

Bullying is defined as:

“Behaviour by an individual or a group, usually repeated over time that intentionally hurts another individual either physically or emotionally and involves an imbalance of power”.

Bullying can include: name calling, taunting, mocking, making offensive comments; kicking; hitting; taking belongings; producing offensive graffiti; gossiping; excluding people from groups and spreading hurtful and untruthful rumours.

This includes the same inappropriate and harmful behaviours expressed via digital devices (‘cyber bullying’) such as the sending of inappropriate messages by phone, text, Instant Messenger, through websites and social media sites and apps, and sending offensive or degrading images by mobile phone or via the internet.

As an inclusive, international school community we are particularly sensitive to any form of bullying that is related to the victim’s race; nationality; religion; culture; sexual orientation or SEND (Special Educational Need or Disability).

3) Preventing, Identifying and Responding to Bullying 

MIS Administration will: 

(3.1) discuss, monitor and review our anti-bullying policy and practice on a regular basis.

(3.2) support all staff in promoting the positive relationships that prevent bullying and will intervene by identifying and tackling bullying behaviour appropriately and promptly.

(3.3) ensure that pupils are aware that all bullying concerns will be dealt with sensitively and effectively; that pupils feel safe to learn and that pupils abide by our anti-bullying policy.

(3.5)  report back to parents or carers regarding their concerns on bullying and deals promptly with complaints. Parents and carers in turn are asked to work with the school to uphold our anti-bullying policy.

(4.2)  train all staff – teaching staff, support staff (including administration staff, lunchtime support staff and site support staff) and pastoral staff – to identify all forms of bullying and follow the school policy and procedures (including recording and reporting incidents).

All MIS Staff will

(a) strive to create and support an inclusive environment which promotes a culture of mutual respect, consideration and care for others which will be upheld by all.

(b) work with colleagues and outside agencies to identify all forms of prejudice-driven bullying.

(c) challenge practice which does not uphold the values of tolerance, non-discrimination and respect towards others.

(d) consider all opportunities for addressing bullying in all forms throughout the curriculum, supported by a range of approaches including displays, assemblies, peer support and the student council.

(e) regularly update and evaluate our approach to take into account the developments of technology and provide up-to-date advice and education to all stakeholders regarding positive online behaviour.

(f) proactively gather and record concerns and intelligence about bullying incidents and issues so as to effectively develop strategies to prevent bullying from occurring.

(g) actively create “safe spaces” for vulnerable children and young people.

(h) use a variety of techniques to resolve the issues between those who bully and those who have been bullied.

(i) celebrate success and achievements to promote and build a positive school ethos.

4) Dealing with Incidents of Bullying

The following steps may be taken when dealing with incidents of bullying:

>  If bullying is suspected or reported, the incident will be dealt with immediately by the member of staff who has been approached.

>  A clear and precise account of the incident will be recorded and given to a member of the management team.

> The management team member will address the incident in accordance with the procedures laid-out in our Behaviour and Discipline Policies.

>  Sanctions will be used as appropriate and in consultation with all parties concerned.

>  Teachers and/or Form Tutors will be kept informed.

>  Parents/carers will be kept informed.

>  If necessary and deemed appropriate, the police will be consulted.

Pupils who have been bullied will be supported by:

>  offering an immediate opportunity to discuss the experience with their teacher or a member of staff of their choice.

>  being advised to keep a record of the bullying as evidence and discuss how to respond to concerns and build resilience as appropriate.

>  reassuring the pupil and providing continuous support.

>  restoring self-esteem and confidence.

Pupils who have bullied will be challenged by:

>  discussing what happened and establishing the concern and the need to change.

>  informing parents/carers to help change the attitude and behaviour of the child.

>  providing appropriate education and support.

>  if online, requesting content be removed and reporting the account and/or content to service provider.

>  sanctioning, in line with the school behaviour and discipline policy. This may include official warnings, detentions, removal of privileges, fixed-term and permanent exclusions.

>  where appropriate, contacting the police.

Members of staff who have been bullied or affected will be supported by:

>  being offered an immediate opportunity to discuss the concern with a member of the senior management team.

>  having the matter dealt with in a sympathetic and supportive manner.

>  being advised to keep a record of the bullying as evidence and discuss how to respond to concerns and build resilience as appropriate.

>  where the bullying takes place outside of the school site then the school, ensuring that the concern is investigated and that appropriate action is taken in accordance with the code of conduct detailed in the employees handbook.

>  instigating disciplinary, civil or legal action.

5.  Involvement of Pupils 

We will:

>  Regularly canvas children and young people’s views on the extent and nature of bullying.>  Ensure that all pupils know how to express worries and anxieties about bullying.

>  Ensure that all pupils are aware of the range of sanctions which may be applied against those engaging in bullying.

>  Involve pupils in anti-bullying campaigns in schools and embedded messages in the wider school curriculum.

>  Offer support to pupils who have been bullied in order to address the problems they have.

6. Involvement of Parents and Carers 

We will:

>  Make sure that key information about bullying is available to parents and carers both online and in print.

>  Ensure that all parents and carers know who to contact if they are worried about bullying.

> Work with all parents and carers and the local community to address issues beyond the school gates that give rise to bullying.

>  Expect that parents work with the school to role model positive behaviour for pupils.

7.  Links with other School Policies and Practices 

This Policy links with a number of other school policies, practices and action plans including:

>  Behaviour and discipline policies

>  Acceptable Use Policy for Internet and On-Line Resources

>  Safeguarding and child protection policy

>  Curriculum Policies such as PSHE and citizenship and computing

>  MIS Employee’s Handbook

Introduction

Mooltripakdee International School (MIS) recognizes the value of computer and other electronic resources to improve student learning and enhance the administration and operation of its schools. To this end, we encourage the responsible use of computers; computer networks, including the Internet; and other electronic resources in support of our educational goals.

Because the Internet is an unregulated, worldwide vehicle for communication, information available to staff and students is impossible to control. Therefore, we have adopted this policy governing the voluntary use of electronic resources and the Internet in order to provide guidance to individuals and groups obtaining access to these resources on MIS-owned equipment.

Policy Aims

It is the policy of MIS to maintain an environment that promotes ethical and responsible conduct in all online network activities by staff and students. It shall be a violation of this policy for any employee, student, or other individual to engage in any activity that does not conform to the established purpose and general rules and policies of the network. Within this general policy, MIS recognizes its legal and ethical obligation to protect the well-being of students in its charge.

To this end, MIS retains the following rights and recognizes the following obligations:

(1) To log network use and to monitor fileserver space utilization by users, and assume no responsibility or liability for files deleted due to violation of fileserver space allotments.

(2) To remove a user account on the network.

(3) To monitor the use of online activities. This may include real-time monitoring of network activity and/or maintaining a log of Internet activity for later review.

(4) To provide internal and external controls as appropriate and feasible. Such controls shall include the right to determine who will have access to MIS-owned equipment and, specifically, to exclude those who do not abide by our acceptable use policy or other policies governing the use of school facilities, equipment, and materials. We reserves the right to restrict online destinations through software or other means.

(5) To provide guidelines and make reasonable efforts to train staff and students in acceptable use and policies governing online communications.

Staff Responsibilities

(1)  Staff members who supervise students, control electronic equipment, or otherwise have occasion to observe student use of said equipment online shall make reasonable efforts to monitor the use of this equipment to assure that it conforms to the terms of the Acceptable Use Policy.

(2)  Staff should make reasonable efforts to become familiar with the Internet and its use so that effective monitoring, instruction, and assistance may be achieved.

User Responsibilities

(1)  Use of the electronic media provided by MIS is a privilege that offers a wealth of information and resources for research. Where it is available, this resource is offered to staff, students, and other patrons at no cost. In order to maintain the privilege, users agree to learn and comply with all of the provisions of this policy.

Acceptable Use:

(1)  All use of the Internet must be in support of educational and research objectives consistent with the mission and objectives of MIS.

(2)  Proper codes of conduct in electronic communication must be used. In news groups, giving out personal information is inappropriate. When using e-mail, extreme caution must always be taken in revealing any information of a personal nature.

(3)  Network accounts are to be used only by the authorized owner of the account for the authorized purpose.

(4)  All communications and information accessible via the network should be assumed to be private property.

(5)  Subscriptions to mailing lists and bulletin boards must be reported to the system administrator. Prior approval for such subscriptions is required for students and staff.

(6)  Exhibit exemplary behavior on the network as a representative of your school and community. Be polite!

(7)  From time to time, the MIS management team will make determinations on whether specific uses of the network are consistent with the acceptable use practice.

Unacceptable Use:

(1)  Giving out personal information about another person, including home address and phone number, is strictly prohibited.

(2)  Any use of the network for commercial or for-profit purposes is prohibited.

(3)  Excessive use of the network for personal business shall be cause for disciplinary action.

(4)  Any use of the network for product advertisement or political lobbying is prohibited.

(5)  Users shall not intentionally seek information on, obtain copies of, or modify files, other data, or passwords belonging to other users, or misrepresent other users on the network.

(6)  No use of the network shall serve to disrupt the use of the network by others. Hardware and/or software shall not be destroyed, modified, or abused in any way.

(7)  Malicious use of the network to develop programs that harass other users or infiltrate a computer or computing system and/or damage the software components of a computer or computing system is prohibited.

(8)  Hate mail, chain letters, harassment, discriminatory remarks, and other antisocial behaviors are prohibited on the network.

(9)  The unauthorized installation of any software, including shareware and freeware, for use on MIS computers is prohibited.

(10)  Use of the network to access or process pornographic material, inappropriate text files (as determined by the system administrator or building administrator), or files dangerous to the integrity of the local area network is prohibited.

(11)  The MIS network may not be used for downloading entertainment software or other files not related to the mission and objectives of the school for transfer to a user’s home computer, personal computer, or other media. This prohibition pertains to freeware, shareware, copyrighted commercial and non-commercial software, and all other forms of software and files not directly related to the instructional and administrative purposes of the school.

(12) Use of the network for any unlawful purpose is prohibited.

(13)  Use of profanity, obscenity, racist terms, or other language that may be offensive to another user is prohibited.

(14)  Playing games is prohibited unless specifically authorized by a teacher for instructional purposes.

(15)  Establishing network or Internet connections to live communications, including voice and/or video (relay chat), is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the system administrator.

                                                                                                                              D   I   S   C   L   A   I   M   E   R 

(1)  Mooltripakdee International School cannot be held accountable for any information or materials that are retrieved via our network.

(2)  Mooltripakdee International School will not be responsible for any damages you may suffer, including loss of data resulting from delays, non-deliveries, or service interruptions caused by our own negligence or your errors or omissions. Use of any information obtained is at your own risk.

(3)  Mooltripakdee International School makes no warranties (expressed or implied) with respect to:

                  (3.1)  the content of any advice or information received by a user, or any costs or charges incurred as a result of seeing or accepting any information; and

                  (3.2) any costs, liability, or damages caused by the way the user chooses to use his or her access to the network.

(4)  Mooltripakdee International School reserves the right to change its policies and rules at any time.

ELS PROGRAM- GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

The ELS (Engliah Language Support) program at MIS is established to provide students who have limited English proficiency with the vocabulary and grammatical structures needed for everyday life and for school performance.  The program functions for students in Year 1 and up.

The ELS teacher uses sound instructional techniques to support learners’ development with the objective of helping students to develop the language skills necessary to be successful at school.  The ELS program provides the English Language Learner (ELL) the opportunity to grasp the academic, social, and cultural aspects of the English language through the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, and listening.

ENTRY CRITERIA

The target population for the ELS program is defined in term of the competency of each student in English. Students who are identified as needing support are provided with instruction.

Registration and Identification

There are several ways that a student may identified for participation consideration in the ELS program.  A new student will usually by assessed for appropriate proficiency in English by a member of the teaching staff. Students with a limited background in English may then be referred to the ELS program to be assessed. Teachers may also refer students.

Assessment and ELS Placement

Students recognized as possibly benefiting from the ELS program will be evaluated by an ELS teacher using the Idea Proficiency Test to determine ELS instructional level placement.

The school will notify parents of their child’s participation in the ELS program.  Evaluation is on-going with students changing levels as needed.  Exit procedures and follow-up contact are conducted as deemed appropriate by the specific needs of the students.

ELS Levels and Teaching Strategies

Upon analysis of the language assessment, the student who falls within one of the first four levels listed below will be provided instruction on the ELS program.

Level I – Beginner – This would be considered the Non-English Proficiency Stage

Students initially have little or no understanding of English.

  Level II – Early Intermediate – This would be considered the Receptive Language Stage.

 Students can understand phrases and short sentences.

Level III – Intermediate – This would be considered the Survival English Stage.

Students understand more complex speech but still require repetition.

Level IV – Early Advanced – This would be considered the Developing Fluency Stage.

 Students’ language skills are adequate for most day-to-day communication. They are beginning to express themselves spontaneously and with increasing fluency.

Level V – Advanced – This would be considered the Fluency Stage.

Students are able to communicate their thoughts fully in English.

EXIT CRITERIA

The exit criteria provided below for English Language Learners (ELLs) represent valid and reliable evidence of a student’s English language proficiency to exit from an English language instructional program.

In order to meet the school’s ELS programme exit criteria, all of the required exit criteria listed below must be met:

(1) Recommendation of the classroom teacher.

(2)  Demonstrated ability to complete year level work without accommodations.

(3) Adequate scoring on the IPT.

(4) Recommendation of the ELS teacher.

Parents may decline or discontinue ELS Program involvement, but they must complete an Opt Out form. A consultation with the ELS teacher is strongly recommended.

THE ESL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM


A variety of educational materials – trade and teacher adapted or produced – are used to support the theme-based and unit-based ELS program.  Proficiency encompasses the four skill areas:  listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Cognitive academic language proficiency (CALP) is addressed, but the main focus is the development of basic interpersonal communication skills (BICS).  Content vocabulary and comprehension needs are addressed in all levels of the program.

Reporting Student Progress

Students in the ELS program will receive a report every term as part of their general school report.

PROGRAM EVALUATION PROCEDURES

Program evaluation is conducted on an on-going basis via input from administrators, the ELS Committee, staff and parents. Most importantly, program analysis is conducted by interpreting student progress and achievement.

Behaviour Policy for Pre-School and Kindergarten

The Purpose of our Behaviour Policy

An integral part of the ethos at MIS is to provide our students with a happy, safe and welcoming community where they are taught to embrace the ideals of fairness, justice, honesty, integrity and personal responsibility.

At the Early Years and Foundation Stages (EYFS) we focus on Personal, Social and Emotional Development and developing life skills. This in turn promotes self-regulation. We want our children to be confident, happy and involved. This will ensure that children make the best all round progress.

Having high expectations for behaviour throughout the school is the most effective way of supporting our students as they develop both socially and intellectually. This behaviour policy sets out our expectations for student behaviour and the consequences that may follow when those expectations are not met.

There are three principles that underpin most successful behaviour policies. We have tried our best to incorporate these principles into our policy:

1.   Consistency – the policy should be applied equally to all students, whilst acknowledging some flexibility for mitigating or extenuating circumstances.

2.   Fairness – the policy should be accepted as fair by all parties.

3.   Transparency – the policy should be easy to understand and implement.

MIS will always make reasonable adjustments for children with special needs or disabilities, and vulnerable children, when implementing out behaviour policy.

Partnership with Parents

We believe that our parents have an important role to play in the successful implementation of our behaviour policy. Forging a close and cooperative relationship between teachers and parents is essential if our youngest students are going to experience our behavioural expectations as consistent and fair.

At MIS we encourage parents to be involved by:

   Issuing a progress report at the end of every term (3 times a year)

♦   Inviting parents to attend a formal Parent/Teacher conference twice a year

♦   Discussing any issues as and when they arise

   Welcoming parents onto the school campus to interact with teaching staff and other parents

♦   Regularly communicating with parents via social media

Acknowledging Behaviour – General Principles

Acknowledging acceptable and unacceptable behaviour consistently and appropriately ensures that most children are able to meet the expected standards of behaviour quickly and effectively.

Behaviour we encourage:Unacceptable behaviour includes:

• Respect for others

• A sense of right and wrong.

• Respect for the environment.

• Working co-operatively.

• Honesty and trust.

• Fairness.

• A good attitude to work.

• Politeness and good manners.

• Setting a good example.

• Dealing with emotions

• Violence and aggression.

• Dishonesty.

• Deliberate disobedience.

• Discrimination.

• Lack of respect.

• Using unacceptable language.

• Deliberately damaging property.

• Disrupting teaching and learning.

• Unwillingness to engage with learning.

• Taking things that do not belong to us.

Rewards

Here at MIS we believe in promoting positive behaviour through rewards schemes. All of our Early Years and Foundation scheme classes operate rewards schemes which usually include a visual component such as a wall chart or ladder. Some of the most commonly used rewards schemes include ‘Star of the Week’; class certificates and special ‘reward’ activities.

Consequences

Sometimes, as a last resort, children need time to reflect or have some quiet time.

This involves insisting children move away from what that are doing and sit somewhere to reflect. This should be a safe and comfortable place. Children should always be given a warning before having reflection time. This time should be appropriately set for the child’s age they should not talk to anyone during that time.

If teachers continue to have concerns over some aspects of a child’s behaviour they may introduce a simple behaviour chart. These charts typically use stickers to monitor the child’s behaviour through the course of the school day. Some parents find it useful to continue using the behaviour chart at home too. This is a very effective way of getting children to reflect on their behaviour and learn strategies for coping with challenging situations.

If this, and other positive approaches are not being successful we will seek support from other members of staff who have specialist experience in managing inappropriate behaviour. If this also proves unsuccessful we may, with permission from the parents, seek the help of external agencies for assessment and intervention strategies.

Biting

 Biting is a common behaviour among children and can be a concern for parents and staff. Biting can often be painful and frightening for the child who has been bitten and also frightening for the child who bites. Biting happens for different reasons with different children and under different circumstances. This is part of some children’s development and can be triggered when they do not yet have the words to communicate their anger, frustration or need.

We aim to act quickly and efficiently when dealing with any case of biting. We will treat each incident with care and patience, helping children to manage their feelings and talk about them to help resolve issues and promote understanding.

Procedure

In the event of a biting incident:

1.    The child who has been bitten will be the priority and should be comforted and given reassurance.

2.    Once the child is calm, staff should check for any visual injury. If there is a bite mark, the child will be taken to the school nurse who will administer any appropriate first aid.

3.     If the skin is broken:

         In cases where the bite has broken the child’s skin they should be immediately taken to the school nurse for first aid treatment. A member of staff must also contact the parent of the child as soon as possible. This phone call should be sensitive and give reassurance to the parent/carer and explain what action has been taken. If the skin has been severely broken the child should be taken to hospital immediately.

4.      If the skin is not broken:

Staff should wait 45 to 60 minutes and then check if there is bruising or a bite mark still present. If there is no obvious mark or bruising this can then be discussed with the parents at collection time.

If after 45 to 60 mins the bite has left the child with a bite mark or bruising then a member of staff should contact the parents of the child to inform them of the incident.

5.     The staff member who witnessed the incident should complete an Incident Form for all children involved.

6.     The lead classroom teacher must be informed of all biting incidents.

7.     The parents of the child who has bitten another person should be informed at collection time; this must be handled in a sensitive and confidential manner.

8.     Wherever possible the child who has bitten should have their behaviour managed by their lead teacher and the consequence of this behaviour should be explained in a way which is appropriate to the child’s age and stage of development.

9.      Where a child may repeatedly bite and/or if they have a particular special educational need or disability that lends itself to increased biting the EYFS coordinator will carry out a risk assessment.

Discipline Policy for Primary School

The Purpose of our Discipline Policy

An integral part of the ethos at MIS is to provide our students with a happy, safe and welcoming community where they are taught to embrace the ideals of fairness, justice, honesty, integrity and personal responsibility. Alongside these character-forming components we also aim to teach our students the skills necessary to become successful learners: application, diligence, determination and self-motivation.

Having high expectations for behaviour that are applied consistently throughout the school is the most effective way of supporting our students as they work towards these ideals. This discipline policy sets out our expectations for student behaviour and the consequences that may follow when those expectations are not met.

There are three principles that underpin most successful discipline policies. We have tried our best to incorporate these principles into our policy:

1.     Consistency – the policy should be applied equally to all students, whilst acknowledging some flexibility for mitigating or extenuating circumstances.

2.     Fairness – the policy should be accepted as fair by all parties and the sanction should be appropriately matched to the misconduct.

3.     Transparency – the policy should be easy to understand and implement.

We believe that our parents have an important role to play in the successful implementation of our discipline policy. Without the support of our students’ families it is very difficult for us to demonstrate to our students that the policy is consistent, fair and transparent. We, therefore, expect parents to endorse this policy and cooperate with its terms.

MIS will always make reasonable adjustments for children with special needs or disabilities, and vulnerable children, when implementing out behaviour policy.

Acknowledging Behaviour – General Principles

Acknowledging acceptable and unacceptable behaviour consistently and appropriately ensures that most children are able to meet the expected standards of behaviour quickly and effectively.

Behaviour we encourage:Unacceptable behaviour includes:

Respect for differences of appearance,

belief or opinion.

A sense of right and wrong.

Self-respect.

Respect for the environment.

Working co-operatively.

Honesty and trust.

Fairness.

A good attitude to work.

Self-discipline.

Politeness and good manners.

Setting a good example.

Taking personal responsibility.

Racial harassment.

Violence and aggression.

Threatening behaviour

Bullying, including cyber-bullying

Dishonesty.

Deliberate disobedience.

Discrimination.

Lack of respect.

Using unacceptable language.

Deliberately damaging property.

Disrupting teaching and learning.

Unwillingness to engage with learning.

Taking things that do not belong to us.

Misconduct

The following examples are given to illustrate some of the most commonly encountered examples of misconduct at school and to give some idea of a progressive scale of misconduct. It is not intended to be a complete list of every possible instance of serious misconduct. In every instance of misconduct, the school reserves the right to decide what constitutes a serious breach of its discipline policy and how serious a breach it considers the misconduct to have been.

 Examples of misconduct
SeriousVery seriousExtremely serious

persistent refusal to follow instructions

 use of foul or abusive language

threatening behaviour

intentionally damaging school  property

fighting

 truancy

 racial discrimination

endangering the safety of others

repetition of any ‘serious’ breach

threatening a member of staff

swearing at a member of staff

bullying (including cyber-bullying)

assault leading to physical injury

deliberate vandalism of school property

inappropriate sexual conduct

theft

persistent repetition of any ‘serious’   breach or

repetition of any ‘very serious’  breach

attacking a member of staff

assault leading to hospitalisation

sexual assault

bringing an offensive weapon into school

Disciplinary Sanctions and Procedures

We expect most disciplinary matters to be dealt with by the teaching and support staff.

Day-to-day discipline issues generally need no outside intervention and are normally dealt with within the confines of the classroom or recreation areas.

It is in the exceptional cases where either;

a) a student has chosen not to cooperate with the teaching staff, or

b) a student has behaved in a manner that we consider to be a more serious breach of discipline that the more serious sanction procedures will begin to apply.

The following graphic illustrates the progression through the sanctions in our discipline policy:

Appeals

The only sanction for which we would normally consider an appeal is that of permanent exclusion. Not only is this the most serious sanction but the two other exclusion sanctions include a meeting between staff, parents and the student concerned to discuss the incident, or incidents, and what steps can be taken to get the student ‘back on track’.

Should a parent wish to appeal against a permanent exclusion decision they should lodge an appeal in writing within seven days of the exclusion date explaining why they believe the decision should be reconsidered. During the appeals process the student in question

must not under any circumstances come onto the school premises.

As with the decision to permanently exclude, the full administration team will meet to discuss the appeal. Once the meeting has reached a decision about the appeal the parent will be informed of that decision. This will mark the end of the appeals process.

Discipline Policy for Secondary School

The Purpose of our Discipline Policy

An integral part of the ethos at MIS is to provide our students with a happy, safe and welcoming community where they are taught to embrace the ideals of fairness, justice, honesty, integrity and personal responsibility. Alongside these character-forming components we also aim to teach our students the skills necessary to become successful learners: application, diligence, determination and self-motivation.

Having high expectations for behaviour that are applied consistently throughout the school is the most effective way of supporting our students as they work towards these ideals. This discipline policy sets out our expectations for student behaviour and the consequences that may follow when those expectations are not met.

There are three principles that underpin most successful discipline policies. We have tried our best to incorporate these principles into our policy:

1.     Consistency – the policy should be applied equally to all students, whilst acknowledging some flexibility for mitigating or extenuating                     circumstances.

2.     Fairness – the policy should be accepted as fair by all parties and the sanction should be appropriately matched to the misconduct.

3.     Transparency – the policy should be easy to understand and implement.

We believe that our parents have an important role to play in the successful implementation of our discipline policy. Without the support of our students’ families it is very difficult for us to demonstrate to our students that the policy is consistent, fair and transparent. We, therefore, expect parents to endorse this policy and cooperate with its terms.

MIS will always make reasonable adjustments for children with special needs or disabilities, and vulnerable children, when implementing out behaviour policy.

Acknowledging Behaviour – General Principles

Acknowledging acceptable and unacceptable behaviour consistently and appropriately ensures that most children are able to meet the expected standards of behaviour quickly and effectively.

Behaviour we encourage:

Unacceptable behaviour includes:

 Respect for differences of appearance,

   belief or opinion.

 A sense of right and wrong.

Self-respect.

Respect for the environment.

Working co-operatively.

Honesty and trust.

Fairness.

A good attitude to work.

Self-discipline.

Politeness and good manners.

Setting a good example.

Taking personal responsibility.

Racial harassment.

 Violence and aggression.

Threatening behaviour, including bullying.

Dishonesty.

Deliberate disobedience.

Discrimination.

Lack of respect.

Using unacceptable language.

Deliberately damaging property.

Disrupting teaching and learning.

Unwillingness to engage with learning.

Taking things that do not belong to us.

Consuming alcohol or illegal drugs

Code of Conduct

As well as our general principles about behaviour, we have produced a code of conduct for our secondary students. This code of conduct has been designed to be a short, easily digested summary of the main discipline points for our older students. Copies of this code are displayed throughout the secondary school so that both teachers and students can be reminded of our core expectations.

Code of Conduct for Secondary School Students

 All students will be expected to:

     conduct themselves around the building in a safe, sensible manner

     follow reasonable instructions given by the teaching staff

♦     treat all staff and pupils with kindness and respect

     act as role models for the younger students

     show respect for the opinions and beliefs of others

     arrive on time to lessons

     complete all class work to the best of their ability

      hand in homework at the time requested

      take good care of the school’s property and equipment

      dress appropriately in accordance with the school dress code

 Disciplinary Sanctions and Procedures

We expect most disciplinary matters to be dealt with by the teaching and support staff.

Day-to-day discipline issues generally need no outside intervention and are normally dealt with within the confines of the classroom or recreation areas.

It is in the exceptional cases where either;

a) a student has chosen not to cooperate with the teaching staff, or

b) a student has behaved in a manner that we consider to be a more serious breach of discipline that the more serious sanction procedures will begin to apply.

The following graphic illustrates the progression through the sanctions in our discipline policy:

Examples of “serious”, “very serious” and “extremely serious” misconduct

The following examples are given to illustrate some of the most commonly encountered examples of misconduct at school and to give some idea of a progressive scale of misconduct. It is not intended to be a complete list of every possible instance of serious misconduct. In every instance of misconduct, the school reserves the right to decide what constitutes a serious breach of its discipline policy and how serious a breach it considers the misconduct to have been.

Appeals

The only sanction for which we would normally consider an appeal is that of permanent exclusion. Not only is this the most serious sanction, but the two other exclusion sanctions include a meeting between staff, parents and the student concerned to discuss the incident, or incidents, and what steps can be taken to get the student ‘back on track’.

Should a parent wish to appeal against a permanent exclusion decision they should lodge an appeal in writing within seven days of the exclusion date explaining why they believe the decision should be reconsidered. During the appeals process the student in question

must not under any circumstances come onto the school premises. 

As with the decision to permanently exclude, the full administration team will meet to discuss the appeal. Once the meeting has reached a decision about the appeal the parent will be informed of that decision. This will mark the end of the appeals process.

Introduction

At some time, every parent experiences the stress and worry of a child falling ill. It can often occur at a time when parents are busy or feeling unwell themselves. Here at MIS we understand, and sympathise with, these situations. However, our overriding priority is the well-being of our children and staff, and the actions we need to take to protect them as best we can from communicable diseases.

This duty of care we have for the members of our school community has informed the procedures laid-out in this student sickness policy. We would respectfully ask all parents to read the policy and be willing to follow its procedures.

We understand the needs of working parents and do not aim to exclude children from school unnecessarily. However, the decision of school is final when requesting that a child is collected due to illness or infection. Decisions will take into account the needs of the child and those of the other children and staff in school. Children with infectious or contagious diseases will not be permitted to attend for certain periods.

  1. Under no circumstances may a parent bring a sick child to the school if the child shows any signs of illness (see; Symptoms Requiring Removal from School) or is unable to participate in the normal school activities (including being able to play outside). Sick children may expose all children and staff members who they come in contact with to an infectious illness. These people can in turn expose the other children.
  2. Every effort is taken to reduce the spread of illness by encouraging hand washing and other sanitary practices. However, in the event of a child becoming ill and needing to be collected, the parent(s) will be called and should come to pick the child up within one hour (60 minutes) of receiving notification.
  3.  It is very important that you arrive promptly to collect a child who is being sent home due to sickness and that you do not send a child back to school until they have fully recovered. If other children become ill due to exposure to your sick child other parents will be unnecessarily inconvenienced and infectious illnesses will be able to spread.
  4. For the benefit of our staff and other children, a sick child will not be permitted to return to school for 24 hours after they are free of symptoms. Children receiving antibiotics may return 24-48 hour after they have received the first dose of antibiotics or as recommended by their doctor. Allergy related symptoms, and non-communicable illnesses do not require exclusion if you have a note from your doctor.
    • Fever: Fever is defined as having a temperature of 100◦F (37.7◦C) or higher taken under the arm, 101◦F (38◦C) taken orally, or 102◦F (38.8◦C) taken rectally. A child needs to be fever free for a minimum of 24 hours before returning to school without the aid of fever reducing substance.
    • Blood in urine, severe pain or discomfort
    • Stiff neck and visibly enlarged lymph nodes
    • Diarrhea: watery, blood in stool, or 2 or more loose stools within last 4 hours.
    • Vomiting: Please do not bring your child if they have been vomiting at home.
    • Breathing problem, sore throat, swollen glands, loss of voice, hacking or continuous coughing.
    • Runny nose (other than clear), draining eyes or ears.
    • Frequent scratching of body or scalp, lice, rash, or any other spots including ringworm.
  5. Symptoms Requiring Removal From School:

    • Fever: Fever is defined as having a temperature of 100◦F (37.7◦C) or higher taken under the arm, 101◦F (38◦C) taken orally, or 102◦F (38.8◦C) taken rectally. A child needs to be fever free for a minimum of 24 hours before returning to school without the aid of fever reducing substance.
    • Blood in urine, severe pain or discomfort
    • Stiff neck and visibly enlarged lymph nodes
    • Diarrhea: watery, blood in stool, or 2 or more loose stools within last 4 hours.
    • Vomiting: Please do not bring your child if they have been vomiting at home.
    • Breathing problem, sore throat, swollen glands, loss of voice, hacking or continuous coughing.
    • Runny nose (other than clear), draining eyes or ears.
    • Frequent scratching of body or scalp, lice, rash, or any other spots including ringworm.
  6. If a child exhibits any of the following symptoms listed below he/she should not attend school. If such symptoms occur at school, the child will be removed from the classroom and you will be called to take them home.

    Influenza: fever, cough, sneeze, runny nose, sore throat, muscle ache and fatigue

    • Gastroenteritis: abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, poor appetite, fatigue and fever
    • Chickenpox: fever, fatigue, vesicles on head, body and limbs
    • Hand, foot and mouth disease: fever, poor appetite, fatigue, sore throat, painful sores in the mouth, rashes with vesicles on palms and soles
    • Acute conjunctivitis: redness of eyes, itching eyes, excessive tears and abnormal eye secretion
    • Other infections: Infected patches, skin rashes lasting longer than 24 hours, swollen joint, jaundice (yellow eyes or skin), swollen glands (salivary glands)
  7. If your child has a fever or vomiting in the evening he/she needs to stay home for at least 24 hours. If your child is removed from school for a fever, vomiting, diarrhea, or any other infectious illness, they may not return the next day. Your child must be symptom free for 24 hours prior to returning.

  8. A child presenting with signs of conjunctivitis (red eye with discharges) should be collected from school and taken to hospital. A medical certificate should then be sent to the school nurse on their return.

  9. Once the child has been symptom free for 24 hours, or has a physician’s note stating that he/she no longer poses a health risk to themselves or others, they may return to school. If the child has been ill for longer than 3 days, a medical certificate is required before returning to school to show that they are well enough to attend school again.

  10. If a child contracts any of the following diseases (see Excludable Diseases), please report it to us immediately. The child may not return to school until they have been declared fit to do so by a doctor. You must provide us with a doctor’s note on confirming their fitness to return.

    Guidance on Excludable Diseases

    This is to prevent the spread of infection to other children and staff and to allow the child a time to rest, recover and be treated for the illness.

    This shows the illness and situations that require exclusion from school and those that do not.

INTRODUCTION

Mooltripakdee International School is committed to listening to all of our stakeholders who have experienced a problem.  We recognize and acknowledge there will be occasions when things go wrong and there may be a need to make a complaint.  M.I.S. welcomes suggestions and comments from parents, students and staff members and takes any complaints and concerns very seriously.  Any complaint or concern against the school will be dealt with in a fair, open and responsive manner, with the aim of achieving a quick and satisfactory resolution.  We encourage stakeholders to mention these concerns early so that we have the opportunity to rectify the problem or explain the School’s position before it becomes serious.


POLICY AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

In order for the policy and procedures to be effective, Mooltripakdee International School will:

  1. Ensure that a concern or complaint is dealt with in a consistent, fair and open process;
  2. Ensure a timely and thoughtful response to the complaint or concern that will prevent the situation from escalating. In all cases the interest of the child will be central;
  3. Encourage the resolution of problems by informal means wherever possible;
  4. Maintain an accurate written and confidential record of all formal complaints and the stage at which they are resolved;
  5. Reserve the right to inform the complainant in writing that the matter is closed when the complaints procedure has been exhausted. This recourse will be taken on the rare occasion when, despite all stages of the complaint procedure having been followed, a parent remains dissatisfied.


INFORMAL STAGE OF THE COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE

Most complaints can be dealt with at this level through informal discussion with the member of staff involved, key stage/department leader or an administrator.  Face to face meetings are encouraged at a mutually agreeable time to discuss concerns with the member of staff who is most knowledgeable about the issue.

FORMAL STAGE OF THE COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE

 STAGE ONE

Parents or staff members can refer the matter to either of the vice-principals of the school.  This should be in writing and make the situation clear to all concerned parties.  The vice-principal will contact the complainant to clarify the situation and what they want to achieve.  Within three school days of receipt of a written complaint, a further investigation will take place with a follow-up face to face meeting with the complainant.  All parties concerned should then agree on a satisfactory outcome.  There should be a written, signed recording of this and a copy issued to all parties involved.  If the complaint concerns either of the vice-principals the matter will be referred to the principal. 

STAGE TWO

If a resolution has not yet been achieved, then the complaint should be referred to the School Principal.    The Principal will contact the complainant to clarify the issues and what they want to achieve.  A face to face meeting will be arranged at a mutually agreeable time.  Further investigation may be needed; this should be done within five school days.  All parties concerned should then agree on a satisfactory outcome.  There should be a written, signed recording of this and a copy issued to all parties involved.  If the is against the School Principal then the issue should be referred to the owner.

STAGE THREE

If Stage Two is not successful then a Complaints Committee can be assembled to consider the complaint.  This would be the last resort, when all other avenues have been exhausted.  The School Principal will appoint a member of the Senior Leadership Team (impartial) to gather evidence and conduct interviews.  This appointee will provide a detailed report of his/her investigation of the complaint.  Parents/guardians will be given a copy of this report.

The Committee should be made up of three impartial members of staff (at the Principal’s discretion) and meet at a mutually convenient time.  The complainant, Principal, Chair of the Committee and any directly involved member of staff will be invited to this meeting.  Any invited person may bring a support if they wish.  The Chair will present findings; considering all written material and give all parties a voice and opportunity to questions others present.

The Committee will ensure all are treated fairly and a careful written recording will be made of the meeting.  The Committee will deliver a decision, in writing, within five school days of the meeting; this should include reasons for the decision made.

Please note:

The school does not need to consider complaints made more than one year after the incident/situation.

ACCREDITATIONS

International Schools Association of Thailand

IGCSE Cambridge School

Educational Development Trust (pending)

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